Dec 28, 2009

First there is a mountain...

I did my first real image based print as a Christmas project, and oh did I learn things! (Pardon my digital camera, it hasn't felt like taking pictures lately. Its just not into that sort of thing anymore.) So, I started with a drawing and used that to carve a lino block:
I only used the one carved block, but did two color runs - the first black, then navy blue over the top. The black ink was your typical rubber based ink used with lead type and what not, the navy blue was a water based acrylic. Two very different inks. Interrestiinng, she says. I inked up the press as usual for the black run, but because of my acrylic paint/roller fiasco this summer I decided to skip the rollers on the blue run and just brayer the ink directly onto the block. Good idea I think. Here's the first run with black only:
Ink coverage for both runs was not so great. Not because of either ink, but just the press itself. I'm beginning to believe solid even coverage on large areas of color is impossible with the Kelsey, I've heard the stories. I suspect it has something to do with how the arm delivers pressure to the platen -- unevenly?? No amount of impression screwing was getting me anywhere. I tried brayering on a ton of ink which worked for a few pulls, but eventually there was just too much ink on my block. Prints were coming out goopy and sloppy so I had to clean the block off and start fresh. In fact there was so much ink on the block that the print would stick to it as I let the arm down. This actually came out in my favor as I was able to burnish the back of the print, improving coverage slightly.

For this type of print I think I prefer the lighter acrylic ink. It sure came out pretty on my tympan! Also I don't think I'll use the rubber based and water based in combo again. Can't really say why, just a hunch I suppose. I want to move towards printing more images like this and to do so successfully I think I'm going to need a different press... here we go! I'm thinking a larger flatbed for more even coverage and bigger prints! We'll see....

No comments:

Post a Comment